Peter's Story

Hi, My Name is Pete and I am 56 years of age. Back in 2008 I was diagnosed by my GP with a prolapsed pile or haemorrhoid and also I was told that I had irritable bowel syndrome, I was prescribed cream for the haemorrhoid and tablets for the irritable bowel. I was told that the bleeding was usual with haemorrhoids and the frequent visits to the toilet were caused by the irritable bowel syndrome.

Over a period of time and visits to the GP the problem got worse and in 2011 it was decided that I should see a consultant at the hospital as the bleeding had got worse and the visits to the toilet had increased , I was sent to have the haemorrhoid injected to shrink it.

 

After seeing the consultant I was sent for a colonoscopy and was told that I had not got irritable bowel syndrome and the haemorrhoid would need further investigation.

Over a period of time and visits to the GP the problem got worse and in 2011 it was decided that I should see a consultant at the hospital as the bleeding had got worse and the visits to the toilet had increased, I was sent to have the haemorrhoid injected to shrink it.

After seeing the consultant I was sent for a colonoscopy and was told that I had not got irritable bowel syndrome and the haemorrhoid would need further investigation.


First biopsy results showed that there were no cancer cells but I would have to have a further investigation under anaesthetic.
This was carried out and at the same time the surgeon decided that he would remove the offending haemorrhoid (which by now was three polyps that had joined together to form one the size of a hens egg). After further biopsy ‘s the results came back that cancer cells were present.

The consultant then informed me that indeed there were cancer cells and cancer is cancer, he then said due to the position of the polyp it would be necessary to fit a permanent colostomy bag, firstly having radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

I decided that there was no way that I would have a colostomy bag fitted and would just have the radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatments.
I then met the oncologist he had a totally different outlook, he said to me you don’t want a bag do you?
He then explained the radiotherapy and chemotherapy and went on to say about the alternative Papillon treatment that was available in The Wirral , this was the first time I was offered another option to the bag, it gave me choices that the consultant had never done.

So back in June 2011 my radiotherapy and chemotherapy treatments were carried out and the 25 treatments soon passed , after which I was able to go on holiday without the worry of looking for a toilet, on my return home I met with Professor Myint, he proceeded with my first Papillon treatment followed two weeks later with my second treatment, since then I have had regular check ups staggered between professor Myint and my oncologist , I am currently undergoing Argon Gas treatment to stem bleeding that has been caused by the conventional radiotherapy treatment, this was organised by Professor Myint.

To date I am in remission, and thanks to the dedication of Professor Myint am able to enjoy life once again.
I have great respect for Professor Myint who is a man who can’t do enough for his patients and goes the extra mile to help.

I must also mention my partner who has supported me every step of the way in this journey of dealing with bowel cancer.

I do feel after speaking to many patients that GP’s need to refer patients more quickly to a consultant and also the consultants where it is possible should give the patient the option of Papillon treatments and not just go the conventional route as long term it would save a considerable amount of money and dignitary not forgetting the patients confidence.

My thanks go to the Oncologist who knew about the Papillon treatment and Professor Myint for all his work in this field

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